Economy

The economic recovery of Europe
The European economy has been harshly hit by the coronavirus crisis. In a few months, the European Union has managed to take a new step towards solidarity between its member states with the adoption of a maxi recovery plan worth 750 billion euros, financed by commonly-issued debt f for the very first time. EU leaders also approved a new seven-year European budget of 1.1 trillion euros. How will the governments of the world's second economic zone use the resources to help their countries bouncing back?
Head of the Task Force for Relations with the UK, Michel Barnier, pictured during the debate on EU-UK trade and cooperation agreement at the European Parliament in Brussels, on April 27, 2021. Photo: Olivier Hoslet / Pool / AFP
Head of the Task Force for Relations wit... […]

Brexit: how it started, how it’s going

The European Parliament is set to vote on the EU's divorce settlement with Britain, the 1,246-page Trade and Cooperation Agreement. Here's what the post-Brexit pact sets out in key areas:
Portugal PM Antonio Costa (L), European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen (C) and European Parliament President David Sassoli pictured after signing the EU Recovery and Resilience Facility document, designed to help the bloc with the economic impact of COVID-19, at the European Parliament building in Brussels on February 12, 2021. Photo: Olivier Matthys / Pool / AFP
Portugal PM Antonio Costa (L), European ... […]

Europe’s Covid recovery fund starts to fall into place

Negotiations were difficult and the plan got off to a slow start, but Europe's huge post-coronavirus recovery fund may make its first payments in July after two important obstacles were passed
A banner opposing the Super League hangs outside Liverpool FC's Anfield ground in Liverpool, northwest England on April 19, 2021. Photo: Paul Ellis / AFP
A banner opposing the Super League hangs... […]

European Super League football shows shift to ‘closed shop’

The formation of a European Super League highlights a shift by the world's richest football clubs away from sporting merit and towards a "closed shop" that gives them more financial security
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